Open Sol

A blog.

iwasaninnocentchild:

rule number 1: You never ever tell someone to kill themselves

rule number 2: You never tell someone that they are fat

rule number 3: You never tell someone that they are thin

rule number 4: You never judge someone and point their flaws

rule number 5: If you don’t have anything nice to say just shut the hell up

(Source: life-can-be-hard-but-stay-strong, via orgasm)

humansofnewyork:

These two were acting like complete teenagers. When I walked up, she was nuzzling her head against his shoulder. She giggled the entire time I talked with them, while he kept a big goofy grin on his face. And whenever I asked about their relationship, she clutched his arm, looked at him just like this, giggled, then said: “We’re not telling!”

humansofnewyork:

These two were acting like complete teenagers. When I walked up, she was nuzzling her head against his shoulder. She giggled the entire time I talked with them, while he kept a big goofy grin on his face. And whenever I asked about their relationship, she clutched his arm, looked at him just like this, giggled, then said: “We’re not telling!”

(via wittgensteinsmister)

thedailypozitive:

Help us fight anxiety and depression. Be the reason someone feels loved. Buy a sticker, inspire a stranger.

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thedailypozitive:

Help us fight anxiety and depression. Be the reason someone feels loved. Buy a sticker, inspire a stranger.

BUY HERE

halftheskymovement:

In 1873, Harvard gynecologist Edward H. Clarke wrote that women who went to college risked “neuralgia, uterine disease, hysteria, and other derangements of the nervous system.” In his words, a woman’s “system never does two things well at the same time.”
Meet Anandibai Joshi, Keiko Okami and Sabat Islambouli, three women who defied gender norms and became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries: India, Japan and Syria. They graduated  from the first women’s medical college in the world — the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania — at a time when women in America couldn’t vote. Joshi, the best known of the three, was married off at the age of nine, to a 20-year-old man. After losing her 10-day-old baby at the age of 14, she decided to pursue a career in medicine to “render to my poor suffering country women the true medical aid they so sadly stand in need of and which they would rather die than accept at the hands of a male physician.” 
Read more via The Huffington Post.

halftheskymovement:

In 1873, Harvard gynecologist Edward H. Clarke wrote that women who went to college risked “neuralgia, uterine disease, hysteria, and other derangements of the nervous system.” In his words, a woman’s “system never does two things well at the same time.”

Meet Anandibai Joshi, Keiko Okami and Sabat Islambouli, three women who defied gender norms and became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries: India, Japan and Syria. They graduated  from the first women’s medical college in the world — the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania — at a time when women in America couldn’t vote. Joshi, the best known of the three, was married off at the age of nine, to a 20-year-old man. After losing her 10-day-old baby at the age of 14, she decided to pursue a career in medicine to “render to my poor suffering country women the true medical aid they so sadly stand in need of and which they would rather die than accept at the hands of a male physician.” 

Read more via The Huffington Post.

(via frektane)